QRPGuys End-Fed Multiband Antenna

“Unique ham radio kits for the budget minded.” That’s what the masthead proclaims on the QRPGuys website and that is exactly what you’ll find there – a collection of project kits for the builder/QRPer that aren’t found on other kit sites and all offered at a more than fair price.

Current transceiver kits include their AFP-FSK Digital Transceiver, now in its third edition and they also offer a wide variety of other QRP essentials including several antennas and tuners, test gear including power meters, attenuators and filters and other accessories,

The QRP Guys are an affiliation of a “who’s who” of QRP building and will give you an idea of the innovative and high-quality products they develop. Ken LoCasale (WA4MNT) provides kit mechanical design, board layout and documentation, and NorCal cofounder Doug Hendricks (KI6DS) is credited with logistic support and beta testing.

Circuit design is by Steve Weber (KD1JV) of Pacific Antenna, Dan Tayloe, creator of the N7VE SWR Bridge, and Cliff Donley (K8TND). Both Steve and “Kazu” Terasaki (AG5NS) author firmware, technical assistance is given by beta builder Yin Shih (N9YS) and John Stevens (K5JS) is credited with assisting Ken with website maintenance.

Building the QRPGuys 40-30-20 M End Fed Antenna

The QRPGuys multiband end fed antenna meets my definition of an easy build with only 16 solder-in components on the main tuner circuit board and the two traps. I started as I do with all of my kit builds by inventorying and arranging all of the parts. I have been using cigar boxes with clasps on their lids to prevent me from losing small parts before they are needed. Cigar boxes are also ideal for storing works in progress kits when a project will extend beyond a single building session.

This easy to build kit has a minimal number of parts.

The prospective builder should be forewarned that of those sixteen components, four of them are inductors that must be hand-wound on toroid coil forms. Many builders seem to abhor the winding of coils, and while I find it sometimes fiddly work, I’ve come to not mid the process.

I give props to the writers of the QRPGuys manual, as they provided some of the clearest instruction on how to wind the inductors, including the number of loops and where to place the taps. The manual also includes a nicely done illustration of each inductor and hints on how to assure the builder wound them correctly.

The diagram from the instruction manual clearly depicts how to wind the four inductors.

The inclusion of Thermaleze┬« brand magnet wire for the inductors was also a nice feature – the enamel coating was quickly dispatched after a few seconds of exposure to my Zippo cigar torch.

The entire build, including the winding of the four toroids, building the traps and measuring the three driven element lengths of wire took me less than 2 hours working at a leisurely pace on a winter’s Sunday morning.

About the Antenna

Field testing this antenna will have to wait a few more weeks for more reasonable weather here in Connecticut, but my plan is to use this antenna for QRP POTA activations this year with various homebuilt radios such as the Ramsey QRP20 transmitter I assembled last week. The end-fed design should make for easy deployment as a sloper while operating from the field with easy access to the tuning controls from my operating position.

The tuner circuit design is as straightforward as it gets – your basic tunable L-C circuit with a varicon capacitor. But the kit also employs the N7VE LED absorption bridge that keeps SWR to a minimum of 2:1 when set to the tune position. According to the kit documentation, the LED indicates only reflected power. Full LED brilliance will indicate an SWR at 4:1 or greater. At half brilliance SWR is approximately 2:1, and the LED will completely extinguish at 1:1.

I was impressed with the apparent high quality of the PCBs and components, and I found the instructions and supporting documentation to be exceptionally well written – easy to follow and understand.

If you would like to build the QRPGuys Multi-band End Fed Antenna, you can purchase the kit on their website here. The current price of the kit is $40 USD.

If you have built this kit, or have any questions or comments, please feel free to leave a comment or drop me a line at james@ab1dq.com.

72 de AB1DQ/James